Introduced Wildlife Hollows

Types of introduced wildlife hollows

Treetec arborist safely in canopy and using Hollowhog tool to modify a dead branch to become an introduced wildlife hollow.
Treetec arborist safely in canopy and using Hollowhog tool to modify a dead branch to become an introduced wildlife hollow.

There are a range of methods for introducing a “wildlife cavity” or “wildlife hollow” into a tree or log. There is no right or wrong way to create an introduced hollow however there are some key considerations.

Wildlife hollows can be fully created where the tree is not of a mature enough age to have developed hollows yet. Or an existing small hollow, wound or other tree damage may be able to be accelerated or expanded to create a hollow of a size to suit a home for our native wildlife.

Failed branch (broken) has been expanded and modified into an introduced wildlife hollow - spout formation.
Failed branch (broken) has been expanded and modified into an introduced wildlife hollow – spout formation.

Acceleration of hollow formation has been explored around the world with tools such as fire and water. Some methods are faster (e.g. explosives) or slower (e.g. fungal inoculation) and Treetec continue to experiment with a range of techniques.  Our information relates to the introduction of completed usable hollows for a range native Australian wildlife species.

Many types of tools can be used, particularly hole boring and wood cutting tools attached to grinders. Currently in the industry there are three primary methods being used for mechanically introduced hollows in trees:

 

  1. Treetec / Narrow Door Hollow
  2. Hollowhog Hollow
  3. Faceplate Hollow

Our team of arborists and ecologists can assist on any canopy access project relating to creating habitat, research and monitoring of wildlife in trees. Treetec are specialists in canopy access services for arboreal (tree dwelling) wildlife. Here are some stories showcasing Treetec projects: